News

ISPGR World Congress 2019

This Summer I attended the ISPGR 2019 Congress in the beautiful city of Edinburgh. It was great speaking to old friends, making new friends, and of course engaging in the scientific program. I can’t wait for the next conference in … Brisbane. Hope to see you all there again.
Photographs; yours truly presenting a poster on intermittent postural control, and yours truly in a Scottish pub 🙂

There’s no theorem like Bayes’ theorem

I recently developed an interest in Bayesian statistics, or more specifically, Bayesian hypothesis testing. One of the the cool things about the Bayesian approach is that it allows us to accept the null hypothesis. Or more precisely, it allows us to quantify the relative evidence (provided by the data) in favor of the null hypothesis, as compared to the alternative hypothesis (or the other way around). Of course, this is impossible under the frequentist approach where we can only reject the null hypotheis. Since I am apparently one of the very few researchers doing Bayesian stuff at my Department, I was asked to give an introductory talk for a group of PhDs on this topic. So here I am, talking Bayes and wearing Bayes.

Busy week (2/2)

Immediately after returning from the conference I was part of the PhD ceremony of Jonathan de Melker Worms, who received his PhD on July 3rd. I have worked together with Jonathan for about 4 years and we have established a close bond and fine working relationship. Of course sad to see him go, but Jonathan has produced an excellent thesis. Congratulations!! The papers which I co-authored can be downloaded from my publications page.

Busy week (1/2)

Summer 2017 was rather eventful. First I (and many of my colleagues) attended the ISPGR 2017 conference, in Fort Lauderdale. As expected; great conference, superb talks and symposia, and blazing sunshine. My personal highlight was chairing and co-organizing the symposium entitled ‘(E)motion: The effect of emotion on human posture and gait control in health and illness.’ There were 4 excellent speakers; Brad Fawver, Mihalis Doumas, Laura Avanzino, and Jeffrey Staab. Thank you all guys! I also presented this poster on a study i hope to continue soon.

new paper in ACP

Really excited that my new paper is now about to appear in Advances in Cognitive Psychology. This was a study which I performed with Rouwen Cañal-Bruland, Fernando Marmolejo-Ramos, Femke Hulzinga, and Eric Wenker. Thank you guys, so much! In the paper we demonstrate for the first time that sentence meaning can have an impact in how we regulate postural balance. Full text available under ‘publications’. Enjoy!

Visit to Japan (3)

I am really excited that our paper finally came out in Frontiers in Neuroscience, which I co-authored with my Japanese friends and co-workers. In this paper we demonstrated that the posture of the arm (constrained behind the back) influences the speed at which Japanese verbs were processed. Full text available here. And congratulations to Masaaki Yasuda for passing his PhD defense in Japan. おめでとう !

ISPGR World Congress 2015

CI3VbAhUAAAz49t.jpg largeThe ISPGR World Congress 2015 in Seville, Spain (June 28 – July 2) was a truly wonderful conference. Praise for the organizers and researchers who made this conference a stimulating scientific (and social) experience. Also, the city of Seville was stunning; some of us challenged the scorching Spain heat to visit some beautiful landmarks, such as the royal palace Alcázar of Seville.
The photograph shows the Amsterdam conference goers, who are all in good spirits. Can you spot yours truly? 🙂
Already looking forward to the next meeting.
(Photo: Sjoerd Bruijn, @sjoerdmb)

Still not significant?

In psychology we usually adopt the arbitrary significant threshold of p = .05. But what if our p-values end up slightly higher? It turns out there are numerous linguistic phrases that make the null-finding appear more interesting, such as ‘trend towards significance’. Here is a very funny and informative list. Read and enjoy!

Visit to Japan (2)

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I received a very warm welcome at Tokyo Metropolitan University, and I have heard numerous very interesting research presentations. There is so much overlap between my own research and the research here in Tokyo; no doubt this will result in ongoing collaboration. In the picture to my right (left for the viewer) sits Dr. Takahiro Higuchi, and to my left Dr. Kazunobu Fukuhara.

Visit to Japan

japanThanks to a fellowship of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) I can pay a visit to several research labs in Japan. My stay lasts from 8/11/2014 untill 10/12/2014. I especially hope to establish scientific collaboration with Dr. Takahiro Higuchi, who is at Tokyo Metropolitan University. I’ll keep you updated!